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William Fisher, Professor of Intellectual Property Law, WilmerHale; Faculty Director, Berkman Center for Internet and Society; Co-Director, Global Access in Action

Professor Fisher received his undergraduate degree in American Studies from Amherst College and his graduate degrees (J.D. and Ph.D. in the History of American Civilization) from Harvard University. Between 1982 and 1984, he served as a law clerk to Judge Harry T. Edwards of the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and then to Justice Thurgood Marshall of the United States Supreme Court. Since 1984, he has taught at Harvard Law School, where he is currently the Wilmer Hale Professor of Intellectual Property Law and the Director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society. His academic honors include a Danforth Postbaccalaureate Fellowship (1978- 1982) and a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in Stanford, California (1992-1993).

 

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Quentin Palfrey, Co-Director, Global Access in Action, Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard; Executive Director, Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) North America (MIT)

Quentin Palfrey is a co-Director of Global Access in Action, a project of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University that conducts action-oriented research into access to lifesaving medicines, and alternative incentives for the development of medical treatments for underserved populations. Palfrey also serves as Executive Director of J-PAL North America, which works to improve the effectiveness of social programs through research, policy outreach, and capacity building. Based at MIT, J-PAL North America seeks to help decision-makers use research evidence in policy decisions and program design and to provide training courses on the value of impact evaluation. From 2011 to 2013, he was Senior Advisor for Jobs & Competitiveness in the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy. While there, he served as lead White House policy staffer on a successful patent reform effort that led to the signing of the America Invents Act. He also coordinated White House input into a report to Congress on the national strategy for innovation and competitiveness, and was involved in a wide range of other initiatives including the launch of Patents for Humanity and the re- launch of the Privacy & Civil Liberties Oversight Board. Prior to joining the White House, Quentin was the Deputy General Counsel for Strategic Initiatives at the US Department of Commerce. Additionally, he served as lead lawyer on developing Department views on many cases in litigation at the US Supreme Court and US Courts of Appeals. From 2007 to 2009, Quentin was Chief of the Health Care Division in the Office of the Massachusetts Attorney General. A lawyer by training, Quentin holds a J.D. from Harvard Law School and has worked as an attorney in private practice at the law firms WilmerHale and Cravath, Swaine & Moore.

Head shot of Professor Mark Wu

Mark Wu, Assistant Professor, Harvard Law School, Co- Director, Global Access in Action

Mark Wu is an Assistant Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, where he teaches international trade and international economic law. Previously, he served as the Director for Intellectual Property in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative where he was the lead U.S. negotiator for the IP chapters of several free trade agreements. He also worked as an engagement manager for McKinsey & Co. where he focused on high-tech companies. He began his career as an economist and operations officer for the World Bank in China, working on environmental, urban development, health, and rural poverty issues. He has also served as an economist for the United Nations Development Programme in Namibia. After earning a J.D. from Yale Law School, he clerked for Judge Pierre Leval on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and was an Academic Fellow at Columbia Law School. He received his M.Sc. in Development Economics from Oxford University, which he attended on a Rhodes Scholarship, and his A.B. summa cum laude in Social Studies and East Asian Studies from Harvard University. 

Ruth Okediji, Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, Co- Director, Global Access in Action

Ruth L. Okediji is a renowned scholar in international intellectual property (IP) law and a foremost authority on the role of intellectual property in social and economic development. She holds the William L. Prosser Professorship at the University of Minnesota Law School where she teaches contracts, international intellectual property, copyright, trademarks and IP and development. Professor Okediji’s scholarship focuses on the international regulatory environment for knowledge goods, innovation policy and global knowledge governance. She has authored an extensive array of articles, commissioned papers and book chapters on the international patent system, international copyright law, technology transfer and economic development. Professor Okediji has served as a policy advisor to many inter-governmental organizations, regional economic communities and national governments on the formulation of copyright and patent policies, and on institutional design choices related to IP administration. Her work has served to guide and influence government policies in sub-Saharan Africa, the Carribbean and Latin America on national strategies for the implementation of the WTO’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS Agreement). Professor Okediji is a graduate of the University of Jos and Harvard Law School.

Ashveena Gajeelee, Fellow, Global Access in Action
Ashveena Gajeelee is a public policy specialist with experience in government, regulatory affairs and negotiation. Ashveena supports GAiA’s action-oriented research which focuses on global public health challenges facing the world’s most vulnerable populations. Ashveena has worked in several governmental ministries in her home country of Mauritius including Agriculture, Prime Minister’s Office and Environment. After several years in government, she joined the Financial Services Commission, where she was the Head of Policy and International Affairs. Following the financial crisis, Ashveena was intensely active in working with Southern African Development Community countries to implement international norms in the financial services sector and ensuring compliance to fight money laundering and financing of terrorism. As a Fulbright Humphrey Fellow she worked at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston to research best practice of community development outreach and financial literacy. She was most recently the advisor to the Minister of Finance and Economic Development. She has a strong research interest in how regulatory policy impact access to medicine and health equity. Ashveena holds a Bachelor of Science in Microbiology and Biochemistry at Rhodes University, a MPA from Ecole Nationale d’Administration (ENA), France and a dual master from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government (MPA) and the Graduate Institute of Geneva (International Affairs).